Monday, April 11, 2016

the Charnley-Persky house

Despite the freezing rain today, someone came and picked up the last tree's worth of elm and sassafras logs!  Take that ground termites!!!

Equally cold (like that segue?) was the 1892 Louis Sullivan Charnley-Persky house.  To it's credit, there was no decoration or meaningful furnishing in the house whatsoever, so it's hard to gauge the true feeling of the place.  Even more so since the vestibule was undergoing restoration and couldn't be viewed.  And yes, my pictures are still awful.  There were very few tours of this one, and it was inexplicably crowded and rushed.  No one was here to see Sullivan, they were only interested in the FLW connection.  Oh well, other than the stunning carving and mosaic fireplace there wasn't much to see beyond office space.

The previous awful winter had caused integrated drainage pipes to back up and flood the basement, ruining the original floors.  The McDonalds style floor was installed not because it matched the original, but because someone donated it.  Poor choice...


The range hood on the other hand...  I could be convinced to sell my soul for that one...





 

















I really ought to try and dig up some early photos while it was still a residence, but instead, I'm going back to work in the basement and dodge that uncomfortably cold drizzle outside.  Oh Spring, couldn't you have lasted long enough to let my magnolia bloom, instead of just freezing the buds to little blacked bits?

4 comments:

  1. Tragedy about the kitchen floor; I bet they regret putting down the ugly floor. Another stunning house. Are these pictures also from last year? I hope your weather turns warmer for you soon.

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    1. Also from last year! Sadly, I don't think anyone there quite recognized how bad it was. Those sconces throughout the first floor may have been even worse though...

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  2. How big this house looks and amazing too at the same time, this is beautifully decorated and one can have a great help in designing their own house.

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